Windows (United States, 4 min 37 sec)

Directed by: Jason Allen Lee

Windows is an experimental film that explores the concept of privacy and surveillance through time-lapse photography.

Review:

Filmmaker Jason Allen Lee’s piece Windows gives us a chillingly powerful peek into the private lives of the public, following the notion that privacy is dead. As a story, that’s also takes on the role of an artistic expose on modern media, Lee’s piece proves incredibly self-aware of the impact of social media on privacy within modern society, taking this treason on privacy and encroaching one step further by allowing the viewer to trespass the glass screen that separates the real from the online, and leave us with just the real. Windows uses a clever combination of changing camera angles, quick-paced time-lapses, and steady to quick zooms, paired with music provided by Trentemoller, to intensify the scenes, and further invade and capture what we refuse to expose to media – the ordinary, the emotional, the raw, and the intimate.