Directed by: David Evans

Written by: David Evans

In the new documentary “The Silkies of Madagascar,' award-winning filmmaker David Evans tells the story of how access to global markets preserves an ancient tradition, empowers women, and changes the future for their children. A young Peace Corps volunteer and a seasoned folk art visionary team up to change everything for the Silkies.

A character-driven documentary about the weavers, primarily women, follows young Rado on her first trip outside of Madagascar to a Santa Fe folk art market. Income from the 3-day market would normally take 15 years to earn. The effect is staggering. Viewers travel to Madagascar and see changed lives, healthier families, and communities with changed attitudes towards the role of women.

According to U.S. Ambassador at Large for Global Women's Issues Melanne Verveer, artisan businesses are the primary income source of people living in the developing world, second only to agriculture. Says the film's director David Evans: 'Financial Literacy coupled with opportunity for women in developing countries is going to change the world.'

The trailer for this film has won awards and been screened around the world, written about in in newspapers, magazines, and even featured in a Lancet article. It attracting the attention of Chelsea Clinton, board member of The Clinton Foundation, who requested an advance copy of the film.

We hope the 25 minute version gets even more traction because every time this film is seen, it advances the cause of traditional artisans, and that's why we made it.

Medium-Word Synopsis (French)
None provided by applicant.

Long Synopsis
In the new documentary “The Silkies of Madagascar,' award-winning filmmaker David Evans tells the story of how access to global markets preserves an ancient tradition, empowers women, and changes the future for their children. A young Peace Corps volunteer and a seasoned folk art visionary team up to change everything for the Silkies.

A character-driven documentary about the weavers, primarily women, follows young Rado on her first trip outside of Madagascar to a Santa Fe folk art market. Income from the 3-day market would normally take 15 years to earn. The effect is staggering. Viewers travel to Madagascar and see changed lives, healthier families, and communities with changed attitudes towards the role of women.

According to U.S. Ambassador at Large for Global Women's Issues Melanne Verveer, artisan businesses are the primary income source of people living in the developing world, second only to agriculture. Says the film's director David Evans: 'Financial Literacy coupled with opportunity for women in developing countries is going to change the world.'

The trailer for this film has won awards and been screened around the world, written about in in newspapers, magazines, and even featured in a Lancet article. It attracting the attention of Chelsea Clinton, board member of The Clinton Foundation, who requested an advance copy of the film.

We hope the 25 minute version gets even more traction because every time this film is seen, it advances the cause of traditional artisans, and that's why we made it.

The film won a 2013 CINE Golden Eagle Award, and was a finalist for the $10,000 Eric Moe Sustainability Film Award, given by the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital. It will screen along with the winning film at National Geographic Society on March 20.